HEALTH RISKS OF HIGH POTASSIUM

If the potassium level in your blood gets too high, you could be at risk for serious health issues. These may include an irregular heartbeat, heart attack, temporary paralysis, or even death.

  • CHEST PAINS OR IRREGULAR HEARTBEAT

    May feel like your heart is skipping beats

  • OTHER HEART PROBLEMS

    Including the risk of a heart attack

  • TEMPORARY PARALYSIS

    Could result in hospitalization

  • DEATH

    Possible due to heart attack or your heart stopping

Health issues from high potassium can happen more than once—and it’s hard to know when they might happen.

Talk to your doctor to find out if you’re at risk for health issues from high potassium.

KEEPING TRACK OF YOUR POTASSIUM LEVEL

Just as you might keep track of your cholesterol or blood pressure numbers, it’s a good idea to know your potassium level, too. The health risks of high potassium are very real—and they may go up as your potassium level goes up.

WHAT YOUR NUMBER MEANS

Your doctor will perform a blood test to determine the level of potassium in your blood. Your potassium level is measured in milliequivalents per liter of your blood, or mEq/L. You won't need to remember how potassium is measured. Just remember the number that your doctor gives you.

For most people, a normal potassium level is 3.8 to 5.0 mEq/L.

  • HIGH POTASSIUM

    (also known as hyperkalemia)
    5.1
    mEq/L
    and
    above
    The higher the level, the higher the risk
  • NORMAL POTASSIUM

    (also known as normokalemia)
    3.8
    mEq/L
    to 5.0
    mEq/L
    Where your potassium level should be—and can be with proper management
  • LOW POTASSIUM

    (also known as hypokalemia)
    3.7
    mEq/L
    and
    below
    Like high potassium, low potassium comes with health risks but can be treated

Speak with your doctor about your personal high-potassium management goals, and what target number or range might work best for you.

ACT NOW

If you’ve been diagnosed with high potassium, it’s important to remember that it can be managed. So don’t let it get you down. Instead, take action and take control. Now is the time to talk to your doctor about your next steps. These could include diet changes and/or prescription medication.

REMEMBER:

Every day you live with unmanaged high potassium is a day you live with serious health risks—but you can do something about it.

Talk to your doctor about managing your high potassium today.