TAKING CONTROL

High potassium can be managed with diet changes, prescription medication, or a combination of the two.

  • DIET CHANGES
  • PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION
  • DIET CHANGES & PRESCRIPTION MEDICATION

THE IMPORTANCE OF A LOW-POTASSIUM DIET

For some people, high potassium can be managed with changes to their diet alone. But even if you’re on prescription medication, carefully choosing what you eat is a very important part of managing high potassium. Any time you eat food containing a lot of potassium, your potassium level can go up. And when your number goes up, so do your health risks.

Be sure to check with your doctor before making any changes to your diet.

WHAT TO AVOID—AND WHAT TO ENJOY

Avoiding high-potassium foods may feel challenging at times. But limiting how much potassium you consume may be worth the effort if it keeps your health risks from rising any higher. Keep in mind that even low-potassium foods should be eaten in moderation. A large portion of a low-potassium food can add up to a lot of potassium.

Here are some high-potassium foods to avoid or limit, and some low-potassium options to include in your normal diet.

    • HIGH-POTASSIUM FOODS TO AVOID OR LIMIT

      • Avocados

      • Bananas

      • Beans

      • Chocolate

      • Milk

      • Nuts

      • Oranges

      • Peanut Butter

      • Potatoes

      • Spinach

      • Tomatoes

      • Yogurt

    • LOW-POTASSIUM FOODS TO ENJOY IN MODERATION

      • Apples

      • Cherries

      • Coffee

      • Corn

      • Grapes

      • Lettuce

      • Onions

      • Pasta

      • Peas

      • Pineapple

      • Rice

      • Strawberries

Try to avoid or limit food ingredients that contain potassium, like some salt substitutes and muscle-building supplements. Be sure to check with your doctor before making any changes to your diet.

CHECK THE LABEL

Many of the foods we eat have at least some amount of potassium in them. You can usually find out exactly how much by checking the Nutrition Facts Label. Starting in 2018, food companies are required to include potassium content on the Nutrition Facts Label. However, if you have food manufactured before this rule went into effect, it may not include the potassium content. Just because potassium isn’t listed on a Nutrition Facts Label doesn’t mean it’s not in that food.

When looking at a Nutrition Facts Label, it may be helpful to focus on the amount (in mg) instead of the percentage of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA). The RDA is intended for people who don’t have high potassium.

TREATING HIGH POTASSIUM

If you have chronic high potassium, diet changes alone may not be enough to manage it. Along with changes to what you eat, prescription medication can be an effective way to keep your potassium level down.

You and your doctor can discuss any other health issues you may have and how they might affect your treatment options.

WHAT MAKES SENSE FOR YOU?

Talking to your doctor is the best way to learn about high potassium and how you can manage it. Here are a few questions you can ask to get things started:

  • What steps can I take on my own to help lower my potassium level?
  • What are my treatment options? Do any of my other health issues need to be considered?
  • Should I be concerned about any side effects that might come with treatment?

To see more questions and ways you can prepare for your next doctor visit, sign up to receive the Down With High Potassium Kit, including the Conversation Starter.